Whole Wheat Cinnamon Sugar Baked Doughnuts

I love all kinds of doughnuts, with the fried yeasted type being my favorite. The problem with making homemade fried doughnuts, at least when you don’t live with several people, is that you’re left with at least a dozen not very fresh doughnuts the next day. And that’s where baked doughnuts come in.

Most recipes for baked doughnuts, including this one, yield 6, which is just the right amount for two or three people. If you have kids, double the recipe and you’ll be set. And if you don’t have a doughnut pan, you can use a mini muffin pan to create doughnut holes.

Written by: Erin of Texanerin Baking

These are highly adaptable. If you’re not a fan of cinnamon sugar, skip the cinnamon and try a different version. Dried or fresh berries with lemon zest and lemon extract would make an excellent variation. The doughnut itself is sweet enough as is, but you can lightly dust the doughnuts with powdered sugar right before serving just to give them a finished look.

I have to admit that I wasn’t expecting much from these doughnuts. I often make cake doughnuts and although I enjoy them, the texture seems to be a little off most of the time. However, these doughnuts have a wonderfully tender crumb and are nice and light, which isn’t something I’ve experienced with most baked doughnut recipes.

If you’ve made baked doughnuts before, you know that texture usually changes on the second day. That isn’t a problem with this recipe as they’re almost as good and fresh on the second day as they are on the first.

These doughnuts don’t have yeast and come together very quickly. There’s no rising time, no kneading, and no frying. In the morning, almost instant gratification is a huge plus, especially if you’re in a rush to get out the door!

Doughnuts, whether fried or baked, aren’t exactly healthy, but whole wheat flour adds a little nutritional value to this recipe. But don’t worry, the whole wheat flour doesn’t compromise the taste at all, as the cinnamon covers up any traces that these have been made in a healthier way.

What’s your favorite type of homemade doughnut?

Whole Wheat Cinnamon Sugar Baked Doughnuts

Yield: 6 doughnuts or 24 - 30 mini muffins

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 14 minutes

Total Time: 24 minutes

These baked cinnamon sugar doughnuts are given a nutritional lift with the addition of whole wheat flour.

Ingredients:

Doughnuts:

2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
1/3 cup Greek yogurt
3 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Cinnamon Sugar:

1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/3 cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons butter

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a doughnut pan with cooking spray or line a 24 cup mini muffin tin with liners.

In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients (flour through salt). Set this bowl aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the remaining doughnut ingredients (egg through vanilla extract). Add this mixture to the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir, just until combined.

Spoon the batter into the prepared pan, filling between 3/4 and full.

Bake for 12 - 14 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle of a doughnut comes out clean. Let the doughnuts sit for a minute and then remove from the pan. Turn out onto a wire rack to cool.

While the doughnuts are cooling, mix the granulated sugar and cinnamon together in a medium bowl. Melt the butter in another bowl big enough to dunk the doughnuts in. While the doughnuts are still warm, dip the tops of the doughnuts into the butter and then sugar. Serve immediately or store, covered in an airtight container, for up to three days.

by Erin D.

Erin is the blogger behind Texanerin Baking, a blog which focuses on making healthier whole grain, reduced sugar recipes that don't taste healthy. She grew up in Texas and moved to Germany three years ago, where she now lives with her husband. When she’s not baking or thinking about baking, she teaches English and does her best to avoid doing the dishes.